Innisfree Farm: Day 14 & 15 – not just farming

Adding an off-the-farm job considerably reduces (by about 45 hours a week, including travel time) the amount of time I’m actually at the farm.  Here’s what I usually do during the week. 6:15-7:00 – get up, get moving, get ready for work (includes making coffee, packing lunch) 7:15-3:15 – teaching at the high school (this […]

Adding an off-the-farm job considerably reduces (by about 45 hours a week, including travel time) the amount of time I’m actually at the farm.  Here’s what I usually do during the week.

6:15-7:00 – get up, get moving, get ready for work (includes making coffee, packing lunch)

7:15-3:15 – teaching at the high school (this can vary on the end time due to meetings, helping students, talking with colleagues, etc)

3:30-4:00 – get home, check e-mail/facebook, maybe a snack, change to farm clothes

4:00-4:30ish – work on whatever needs done – moving bales for the animals or any of the infinite projects that are going on at any one time, either inside or outside

4:30-6:00 – feed/water animals, collect and clean eggs, housework, projects

6:00-7:00 – supper

after 7:00 – pretty much anything! Work in studio, hang out with Denny, go out, wash laundry, blog, more and other projects…

10:30ish – off to bed

I usually take one day for egg and coffee deliveries, and we have a staff meeting usually once a month, so that changes those days.  Flexibility is very important, which is hard for me at times, since for most of my day, I have a very rigid schedule.  Some days I get home and things go as planned.  Some days I get home and there is something unexpected that needs done, so the plan gets modified. Some days I deal with that better than others…ha!

 

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Innisfree Farm: Rain.

Rain is a curious thing for farmers.  We need it, but at the right times, and in the right quantities.  Too much rain is usually a bad thing overall, but a lot of rain spread out can be good, especially … Continue reading

Rain is a curious thing for farmers.  We need it, but at the right times, and in the right quantities.  Too much rain is usually a bad thing overall, but a lot of rain spread out can be good, especially in the spring when planting.

At this point, we should have some hay mowed and bales made to set by for this coming winter, but it’s raining.  It’s been raining for just long enough each day, for just enough days that the hay pasture is soggy wet.  The grass is up to my waist, but it’s so thick, and the ground is so wet, that we can’t even get our little Kubota tractor out there with the haybine to harvest it.

So what to do?  Work on other farm tasks, work on projects, and wait for the rain to stop.  Right now we could use, contrary to what most people are looking for, some dry and hot days to firm up the ground.

And in the meantime, the cows, chickens, horses, and goats are enjoying the bountiful grass.   It’s never all bad.

Read more at my Innisfree Farm weblog...