Innisfree Farm: 10-10 Challenge 2011 Update

If you’ve been watching farmers over the past few weeks, you may have noticed that the fall harvest has just started. What that means is that they’re going to plant their fall wheat later than normal. You may have discovered the same thing about your own planting, and that’s ok. I haven’t planted my fall […] Continue reading

If you’ve been watching farmers over the past few weeks, you may have noticed that the fall harvest has just started. What that means is that they’re going to plant their fall wheat later than normal. You may have discovered the same thing about your own planting, and that’s ok.

I haven’t planted my fall plantings yet either, and probably won’t until next week. But don’t give up, because it’s still worth doing. One of the secrets to growing ones own food is learning to live with the weather, whatever it might turn out to be.

DLH

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Innisfree Farm: Rain.

Rain is a curious thing for farmers.  We need it, but at the right times, and in the right quantities.  Too much rain is usually a bad thing overall, but a lot of rain spread out can be good, especially … Continue reading

Rain is a curious thing for farmers.  We need it, but at the right times, and in the right quantities.  Too much rain is usually a bad thing overall, but a lot of rain spread out can be good, especially in the spring when planting.

At this point, we should have some hay mowed and bales made to set by for this coming winter, but it’s raining.  It’s been raining for just long enough each day, for just enough days that the hay pasture is soggy wet.  The grass is up to my waist, but it’s so thick, and the ground is so wet, that we can’t even get our little Kubota tractor out there with the haybine to harvest it.

So what to do?  Work on other farm tasks, work on projects, and wait for the rain to stop.  Right now we could use, contrary to what most people are looking for, some dry and hot days to firm up the ground.

And in the meantime, the cows, chickens, horses, and goats are enjoying the bountiful grass.   It’s never all bad.

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Innisfree Farm: A change of pace from the snow…

Woke up to a phone call that school was cancelled, and a lovely coating of ice on everything.   The chicken door was completely iced in its track, but a couple of good kicks broke it loose.  Chicken feet don’t … Continue reading

Woke up to a phone call that school was cancelled, and a lovely coating of ice on everything.   The chicken door was completely iced in its track, but a couple of good kicks broke it loose.  Chicken feet don’t do well on the ice – the poor hens were sliding all over the place!

Looks like there’s another good storm (or “event”, as the radio people were calling it) on the way.  Both man and beast have food, water, and shelter.

Just another winter in Ohio!

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